The Private School Penalty

For the past 9 years, I've worked in private independent and international schools, and before that, I trained and worked in public schools. As I've written before, the challenges that teachers experience in each of these contexts are vastly different. A pedagogy consisting largely of unstructured tasks with ill-defined goals, coupled with a laissez-faire approach … Continue reading The Private School Penalty

Episode 9: On Students’ (Mis)judgments of Learning and Teaching Effectiveness by Carpenter et al.

In this episode of Progressively Incorrect, Zach Groshell and Bradley Arnold discuss "On Students’ (Mis)judgments of Learning and Teaching Effectiveness" by Shana Carpenter and colleagues. While it may be popular to collect student opinion on instructional matters, there is often a conflict between what students think is effective and what is actually effective. We discuss many of the ways that student opinion can have negative or positive effects on the quality of students' education.

Instructional Videos: Perfect for Learning Styles, Popular with Students, and THE FUTURE of Education!

Last week I attended a government-sponsored training on instructional video that began with three weird reasons for why teachers should use more instructional video: Instructional videos cater to students' learning stylesInstructional videos are more popular with students (i.e., they like them) than alternative methodsInstructional videos are the future of learning I'm sure fans of this … Continue reading Instructional Videos: Perfect for Learning Styles, Popular with Students, and THE FUTURE of Education!

Do Students Have a Good Idea of What Helps Them Learn?

An amusing discussion to have with your students is to ask them how they think they learn best. Some will say they are visual learners, others hands-on learners, and some will let you know that they learn best from teachers who teach instead of wasting class time on impromptu discussions. Of course, the myth that … Continue reading Do Students Have a Good Idea of What Helps Them Learn?

Episode 8: The Dynamic Tension at the Core of the Grammar of Schooling by David F. Labaree

In this episode of Progressively Incorrect, Zach Groshell and Bradley Arnold discuss "The Dynamic Tension at the Core of the Grammar of Schooling" by David F. Labaree (@DLabaree). The discussion has us both acknowledging that organizational needs - i.e., what is doable - often prevent large-scale changes to the "grammar of schooling", such as age-graded classrooms, teacher-centered instruction, and a decentralized curriculum.

Cringe!

My last blog post seems to have been this site’s 200th post. What a journey it’s been. Long time readers may have noticed that Stephanie (my wife) used to contribute about half of the posts on educationrickshaw.com. Lately she’s been too busy being one of the best literacy specialists in the country to be messing … Continue reading Cringe!

Episode 7: Dewey Outlines Utopian Schools (1933) by John Dewey

In this episode of Progressively Incorrect, Zach Groshell and Bradley Arnold discuss a New York Times article by John Dewey with the headline, "Dewey Outlines Utopian Schools." Much of the discussion revolves around whether any of Dewey's utopian ideas could be realistically implemented in the world we live in, and both of us question whether informal interest-based learning without a core curriculum would do more harm than good.

Is Classroom Management Based on a “Dim View” of Human Nature?

One of my favorite episodes of the Progressively Incorrect podcast is the one in which we discuss an opinion piece by Alfie Kohn on classroom management. Consistent with his past writing, Kohn takes issue with the idea that schools should concern themselves with externally regulating students’ behaviors, saying that classroom management is based on a … Continue reading Is Classroom Management Based on a “Dim View” of Human Nature?

Episode 6: The Classroom Management Field Can’t Stop Chasing the Wrong Goal by Alfie Kohn

In this episode of Progressively Incorrect, Zach Groshell and Bradley Arnold discuss "The Classroom Management Field Can't Stop Chasing the Wrong Goal" by Alfie Kohn (@alfiekohn). Brad suggests that in an ideal world progressive ideas of classroom management would be enough, but that we live in the real world. Zach wonders what use it is to live in any other world but the real world, and shares some of the real world strategies he's used for classroom management.