Biologically Primary vs. Biologically Secondary Knowledge

Help! I’m Trying to Teach My 9-Month-Old How to Crawl and it isn’t Working.

I have a 9-month-old daughter who still cannot crawl. I've tried having her build up her strength through various leg and abdominal exercises. I've shown her interactive diagrams and YouTube videos of babies crawling, and I've read her the definition of crawling from the dictionary. I've modeled the correct way to crawl so many times … Continue reading Help! I’m Trying to Teach My 9-Month-Old How to Crawl and it isn’t Working.

Every School Needs a Research Group

I'm looking forward to 12:50 this Wednesday, the time that is usually reserved for teachers and students to eat lunch. Usually my lunch routine is to sign out, walk across the street (carefully), and choose between ma la tang or ma la xiang guo from one of the stalls that cater to mostly Chinese college … Continue reading Every School Needs a Research Group

“Beliefs” About How Students Learn can Only Get You So Far.

What are your beliefs about student learning? How do students best learn? If you're like me you've been asked at the start of a PD session or a faculty meeting to discuss your deeply-held beliefs about some aspect of student learning in a Think-Pair-Share or a gallery walk. Or maybe you were interviewed for a … Continue reading “Beliefs” About How Students Learn can Only Get You So Far.

Hands-on, Minds-on: Keeping Play Cognitive

Note: For participants of this workshop, here's the presentation: Hands on MINDS on Final I'm excited to announce a new workshop that I'm leading at The Future of Education Now Conference (#FOEN2019) at Western Academy of Beijing. It is one based around some my recent explorations in cognitive science research, and creativity & design. It also includes … Continue reading Hands-on, Minds-on: Keeping Play Cognitive

Lessons from Cognitive Science that I’ve Used to Improve my Teaching

I  recently gave a presentation called The Cognitive Science of Creative Subjects at Learning2Asia, a conference which I thought was an incredibly well-run by Nanjing International School. The format of the workshop was really fun: Teachers do mostly hands-on, design-related experiments on themselves to sort of demonstrate how different principles in cognitive science work. I also … Continue reading Lessons from Cognitive Science that I’ve Used to Improve my Teaching

What is Instructional Design and does it Matter for K-12 Education?

Instructional design (ID) is the systematic design, development, and implementation of efficient and effective instructional solutions for the purpose of improving learning and performance. Put more simply, instructional design is a reliable way of thinking and acting to design quality instruction. Instructional designers design instructional and performance solutions in a variety of settings, from private corporations … Continue reading What is Instructional Design and does it Matter for K-12 Education?

Beyond Piaget and Vygotsky: Why Teachers’ Cognitive Science Education is Insufficient

I have a challenge for you readers. Name two psychologists/cognitive scientists whose research has impacted education in the past twenty years. Were you able to? Perhaps that was too easy. New challenge! Name two psychologists/cognitive scientists who have published impactful work in the past twenty years AND were also featured at a workshop or PD session that … Continue reading Beyond Piaget and Vygotsky: Why Teachers’ Cognitive Science Education is Insufficient

NEW WORKSHOP: The Cognitive Science of Creative Subjects at Learning2 2019!

I'm (Zach) excited to share that I will be presenting at yet another conference, this time at Learning2 in Nanjing, China. Take a look at the description of the workshop below, which I hope will merge some of my passion for utilizing research to inform teaching with my work in creativity. Hope to see you … Continue reading NEW WORKSHOP: The Cognitive Science of Creative Subjects at Learning2 2019!

Do Teachers Need Research to Be Good Teachers?

Seasoned teachers know a lot about how to do their jobs, and can generally execute the default instruction that we're all familiar with pretty well. Practical knowledge of this kind is sometimes referred to as craft knowledge or wisdom of practice, and it forms the basis of some national teaching assessments (Leinhardt, 2007). While craft knowledge includes … Continue reading Do Teachers Need Research to Be Good Teachers?