Does More Learning Happen When Students are in the Driver’s Seat?

Most teachers will be familiar with Khan Academy, or similar learning programs, that offer a mixture of 1) problems to solve and 2) instructional supports that students can use to learn how to solve the problems. Common instructional supports in online learning environments include partial hints (e.g., click here for a hint to get you … Continue reading Does More Learning Happen When Students are in the Driver’s Seat?

Shifting to Online (again)? Check out this Poster

I am happy my community is back on campus; a beautiful learning space where teachers utilize their physical presence to guide attention and support students towards new understandings. I also realize, having been fooled too may times by COVID, that it’s possible that we’ll be forced to shift once again into a hybrid model (and … Continue reading Shifting to Online (again)? Check out this Poster

Is there a “Science of Learning” and what is in it?

A reoccurring theme (e.g., here, here, and here) of this blog is that we can improve education by leveraging findings from the science of learning. Most people in the field seem to agree with this statement, but it's not uncommon to find people who are convinced that there is no science of learning. The reasons … Continue reading Is there a “Science of Learning” and what is in it?

A Fence at the Top or an Ambulance at the Bottom?

As a school leader, I'm often asked to read things that contain strong claims about the nature of learning. My old approach was to try to weigh the arguments presented in the articles and come to my own conclusions about whether the claims seemed reasonable, regardless of whether the authors had any evidence to support … Continue reading A Fence at the Top or an Ambulance at the Bottom?

Where are our “Leaders with Substance”?

Thanks to John Catt Educational, I've had the chance to read and review some great education books. My last John Catt review was on Walkthrus I and II and this post will contain some of my thoughts on the excellent book "Leaders with Substance" by Matthew Evans. One of the best leaders I've ever met … Continue reading Where are our “Leaders with Substance”?

Do We Learn Best Collaboratively or Individually?

I read an interesting article about collaboration and worked examples today. Worked examples, for those not in the know, are teaching objects that explicitly show students the steps for how to solve a particular type of problem, such as the one below for how to add fractions: Example of a worked example, shared with me … Continue reading Do We Learn Best Collaboratively or Individually?

Navigating The Toggled Term (Review)

I was given the opportunity recently to preview a proof of a new book, Navigating the Toggled Term by Matthew Rhoads. Dr. Matt is also one of the lead authors of Amplifying Learning: A Global Collaborative, a book for which I am contributing the chapter on assessment and feedback. Navigating the Toggled Term is a book for teachers who, having … Continue reading Navigating The Toggled Term (Review)

Summer’s Over. Now What?

Four years ago, I was just starting a PhD in online learning without ever having taught online. A few short years later and we are living in a world where almost every teacher has. When we first went remote, I was teaching Design Technology, a course for elementary students that was essentially "Makerspace" by another … Continue reading Summer’s Over. Now What?

Teaching WalkThrus 1 & 2: Game Changer or Paper Weight?

Teaching WalkThrus is a series of books by Tom Sherrington and Oliver Caviglioli that aims to improve teaching and instructional coaching through text and visuals. After buying the first book (Yellow) back when it first came out, John Catt Educational graciously sent me a copy of the second (Blue) for review here. As a leader … Continue reading Teaching WalkThrus 1 & 2: Game Changer or Paper Weight?