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S2E12: Katharine Birbalsingh on Discipline and Traditional Education

In this episode, I have the pleasure of interviewing Britain's "strictest" headmistress, Katharine Birbalsingh. Katharine is the founder of Michaela Community School, a secondary school in London that always seems to be mired in controversy. As other school leaders have sought to innovate their programs by opting for child-led learning and a softer touch to … Continue reading S2E12: Katharine Birbalsingh on Discipline and Traditional Education

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S2E11: Bradley Busch on Illuminating the Science of Learning

This week I'm speaking with an all-around legend, Bradley Busch, co-author of The Science of Learning, 99 Studies that Every Teacher Needs to Know. Bradley works at InnerDrive, a UK-based professional development company that specializes in bringing the science of learning to life through fantastic visuals, workshops, and webinars. If you follow my blog, educationrickshaw.com, … Continue reading S2E11: Bradley Busch on Illuminating the Science of Learning

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S2E10: Jim “Broccoli Guy” Allen on Substitute Teaching

In this episode of the Progressively Incorrect podcast, I talk substitute and supply teaching with Broccoli Guy (real name: Jim Stewart Allen)! Broccoli Guy is a bit of a local celebrity over here in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. Tune in to any of the Seattle sports games, and the probability is high … Continue reading S2E10: Jim “Broccoli Guy” Allen on Substitute Teaching

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S2E9: Nate Joseph on Meta-Analysis and the Scientific Principles of Teaching

Somehow, someway, we are already on episode 9 of season 2 of the Progressively Incorrect podcast! Today I have the absolute pleasure of talking with the incredible Nate Joseph, the author of the Scientific Principles of Teaching (check out this page for all his books) Nate is a fan of secondary meta-analysis, a methodology popularized … Continue reading S2E9: Nate Joseph on Meta-Analysis and the Scientific Principles of Teaching

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S2E8: Kristin Simmers and Andrew Watson on the Role of Neuroscience in Education

One of my biggest triggers is when a presenter at an education conference will claim, without being able to point to an article or a body of research, that x, y or z is research-based. And more often than not, their research-free claim is accompanied by weird brain-based language. "We know that play-based learning works … Continue reading S2E8: Kristin Simmers and Andrew Watson on the Role of Neuroscience in Education

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Dead Ends from the Explicit Teaching vs. Inquiry-Based Learning Debate

I've learned a lot from engaging in the "teaching wars" that pit teacher-led explicit teaching approaches against student-led inquiry (IBL) and discovery (DL) approaches. I even created a podcast to explore these ideas with other teachers and researchers. Recently, however, I've noticed that the conversation tends to circle around the same territories, often leading to … Continue reading Dead Ends from the Explicit Teaching vs. Inquiry-Based Learning Debate

Do We Want Our Students to Struggle?

Like so many buzzwords in education, it's hard to pin down what people mean by the term "Productive Struggle". Of the two meanings of Productive Struggle I've heard being used most often, the good meaning is uncontroversial, and the bad - and more popular - meaning encourages teachers to abandon principles of effective instruction. The … Continue reading Do We Want Our Students to Struggle?

Why I memorize by educationrickshaw

Why I Memorize

One little-known aspect of international teaching is that very few expat teachers end up learning the local language in the countries where they teach. This may vary by language, of course; I've heard that far more international teachers pick up Spanish than Kazakh, for example; but by and large it seems that most international teachers, … Continue reading Why I Memorize

Immersion Learning Fails Students In More Ways Than One

When I was 16, I attended high school in the French city of Rennes. Like many foreign exchange students before me, I was assigned the same classes as local French students - literature, math and science classes - all, of course, entirely taught in French. Despite my (and my parents') hopes that I would quickly … Continue reading Immersion Learning Fails Students In More Ways Than One