Banner of Progressively Incorrect Podcast Saying New Episode Featuring Kristin Simmers and Andrew Watson

S2E8: Kristin Simmers and Andrew Watson on the Role of Neuroscience in Education

One of my biggest triggers is when a presenter at an education conference will claim, without being able to point to an article or a body of research, that x, y or z is research-based. And more often than not, their research-free claim is accompanied by weird brain-based language. "We know that play-based learning works … Continue reading S2E8: Kristin Simmers and Andrew Watson on the Role of Neuroscience in Education

Banner of Progressively Incorrect Podcast Saying New Episode Featuring Becky Lim and Matt Rhoads

S2E5: Becky Lim and Matt Rhoads on EdTech and Global Collaborations

This is a lovely episode that I recorded towards the end of the summer featuring two of my favorite people in education and edutwitter, Becky Lim and Dr. Matthew Rhoads. Becky and Matt are enthusiastic about the potential for edtech in the classroom, and in this episode they share some of their strategies for developing … Continue reading S2E5: Becky Lim and Matt Rhoads on EdTech and Global Collaborations

Assessment and Feedback Strategies Livestream

In a few short weeks, a book I'm featured in, Amplify Learning: A Global Collaborative, will be released. I'm the author of the chapter on assessment and feedback. On May 26, 2022, 7PM EST, I will be talking with the lead authors of the project about some of the assessment and feedback strategies that I … Continue reading Assessment and Feedback Strategies Livestream

Instructional Videos: Perfect for Learning Styles, Popular with Students, and THE FUTURE of Education!

Last week I attended a government-sponsored training on instructional video that began with three weird reasons for why teachers should use more instructional video: Instructional videos cater to students' learning stylesInstructional videos are more popular with students (i.e., they like them) than alternative methodsInstructional videos are the future of learning I'm sure fans of this … Continue reading Instructional Videos: Perfect for Learning Styles, Popular with Students, and THE FUTURE of Education!

Can a theory improve your teaching by educationrickshaw.com

Can a Theory Improve Your Teaching?

If much of what we learned in teacher training was not very useful once we got to the classroom, and if some theories we were taught, like learning styles, were just plain false, it's tempting to conclude that theory has little to offer the busy teacher. Having used cognitive load theory to streamline my teaching, I can't agree.

PD Opportunity on Cognitive Load Theory

As readers of this blog will know, I've recently been writing a bit about cognitive load theory and how it's led to changes in my thinking and teaching. I debated some of its foundational ideas on a recent podcast, as well. After presenting on CLT in the fall, NWAIS asked me back as part of … Continue reading PD Opportunity on Cognitive Load Theory

Shifting to Online (again)? Check out this Poster

I am happy my community is back on campus; a beautiful learning space where teachers utilize their physical presence to guide attention and support students towards new understandings. I also realize, having been fooled too may times by COVID, that it’s possible that we’ll be forced to shift once again into a hybrid model (and … Continue reading Shifting to Online (again)? Check out this Poster

Is there a “Science of Learning” and what is in it?

A reoccurring theme (e.g., here, here, and here) of this blog is that we can improve education by leveraging findings from the science of learning. Most people in the field seem to agree with this statement, but it's not uncommon to find people who are convinced that there is no science of learning. The reasons … Continue reading Is there a “Science of Learning” and what is in it?

Summer’s Over. Now What?

Four years ago, I was just starting a PhD in online learning without ever having taught online. A few short years later and we are living in a world where almost every teacher has. When we first went remote, I was teaching Design Technology, a course for elementary students that was essentially "Makerspace" by another … Continue reading Summer’s Over. Now What?

Teaching WalkThrus 1 & 2: Game Changer or Paper Weight?

Teaching WalkThrus is a series of books by Tom Sherrington and Oliver Caviglioli that aims to improve teaching and instructional coaching through text and visuals. After buying the first book (Yellow) back when it first came out, John Catt Educational graciously sent me a copy of the second (Blue) for review here. As a leader … Continue reading Teaching WalkThrus 1 & 2: Game Changer or Paper Weight?