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Dead Ends from the Explicit Teaching vs. Inquiry-Based Learning Debate

I've learned a lot from engaging in the "teaching wars" that pit teacher-led explicit teaching approaches against student-led inquiry (IBL) and discovery (DL) approaches. I even created a podcast to explore these ideas with other teachers and researchers. Recently, however, I've noticed that the conversation tends to circle around the same territories, often leading to … Continue reading Dead Ends from the Explicit Teaching vs. Inquiry-Based Learning Debate

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S2E5: Becky Lim and Matt Rhoads on EdTech and Global Collaborations

This is a lovely episode that I recorded towards the end of the summer featuring two of my favorite people in education and edutwitter, Becky Lim and Dr. Matthew Rhoads. Becky and Matt are enthusiastic about the potential for edtech in the classroom, and in this episode they share some of their strategies for developing … Continue reading S2E5: Becky Lim and Matt Rhoads on EdTech and Global Collaborations

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S2E4: Sarah Powell on Myths that Undermine Math Teaching

In this episode, I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Sarah Powell. Sarah is Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Texas at Austin. She has become a go-to expert for research into interventions for students with mathematics difficulties, and she has co-authored an important paper with Elizabeth Hughes and … Continue reading S2E4: Sarah Powell on Myths that Undermine Math Teaching

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S2E3: Tanya Crossman on Third Culture Kids and Raising Children Overseas

In the previous episode of the Progressively Incorrect podcast, I spoke with Jasmine Lane about how teachers should focus on developing their subject knowledge and automaticity with teaching routines in order to move students forward. However, much of our discussion centered around her experience of moving from Minnesota to teach in London, where, she said, … Continue reading S2E3: Tanya Crossman on Third Culture Kids and Raising Children Overseas

Playing Around with Kids’ Education

As I've written before, replacing explicit instruction (not just lecturing, but a scaffolded combination of interactive modeling, questioning, and practice) with fun but trivial activities is not the key to students' hearts. If anything, this causes disillusionment and resentment. Kids are smart enough to recognize that their education is being wasted. In this post, I'd … Continue reading Playing Around with Kids’ Education

S2E2: Jasmine Lane on Subject Expertise and Why She’ll Never Go Back to Teaching in the U.S.

In this episode of the Progressively Incorrect podcast, I had the pleasure of speaking with Jasmine Lane. Jasmine is a secondary English teacher who recently moved from the U.S. to teach in England. I first came across Jasmine through her blog, jasmineteaches.wordpress.com, which was originally about her experiences as a first-year teacher. Back in those … Continue reading S2E2: Jasmine Lane on Subject Expertise and Why She’ll Never Go Back to Teaching in the U.S.

S2E1: Paul A. Kirschner on Minimally Guided Instruction and Cognitive Load

In this episode of the Progressively Incorrect podcast, I had the pleasure of speaking with Paul A. Kirschner. Paul is Emeritus Professor at the Open University of the Netherlands as well as Guest Professor at the Thomas More University of Applied Sciences in Antwerp, Belgium. He is the author of several books, including How Learning … Continue reading S2E1: Paul A. Kirschner on Minimally Guided Instruction and Cognitive Load

Different Schools for Different Fools

To celebrate the completion of my dissertation and my contribution to a new book, I allowed myself back onto Twitter. I had been tweeting via Hootsuite and self-blocking Twitter on my technology so that I could focus on these projects, free from the weight of the nonsense that tends to dominate the platform. My return … Continue reading Different Schools for Different Fools

Can Students Really Self-Differentiate?

Take a look at the screenshot below. It shows a learning activity containing a menu with two choices. Clicking the right button leads to a problem that the student must solve, and clicking the left button leads to an example that shows the student how to solve that sort of problem. This activity is one … Continue reading Can Students Really Self-Differentiate?

Do We Want Our Students to Struggle?

Like so many buzzwords in education, it's hard to pin down what people mean by the term "Productive Struggle". Of the two meanings of Productive Struggle I've heard being used most often, the good meaning is uncontroversial, and the bad - and more popular - meaning encourages teachers to abandon principles of effective instruction. The … Continue reading Do We Want Our Students to Struggle?