In this episode of Progressively Incorrect, we will continue our journey through the education debates by chatting with Daniel Bundred about behavior, specifically on how to turn around a school that struggles to manage it.

I think this episode is a fantastic example of how networking and social media continues to drive change across countries and schools. A few weeks before I recorded this episode, I was contemplating how to get 100% of students to meet the expectation that they enter the classroom quietly and get started on their entry task, which we call the “Do Now”. The whole point of the Do Now is to create a “Strong Start” to lessons by allocating the first five or so minutes of class to silent retrieval practice involving previous material. Having a routine for a controlled entry with a Do Now projected on the board can do wonders to calmly transition students into their classrooms, and it allows teachers to take attendance in peace without wasting the first few minutes of the class period.

The problem I was seeing as an instructional coach was that far too many students were choosing to opt out of the Do Now, which caused all sorts of power struggles between teachers and students. So, I took to Twitter and asked the world what I should do, and the world answered, but the strategies and techniques that were the most specific and actionable were those offered by Daniel Bundred. Daniel described how the best administrators in previous schools he’d worked at designed whole school systems – rather than relying on individual teachers – to turn around chronic misbehavior and underachievement. Immediately after Daniel and I recorded this episode, I actually implemented several of his suggestions in my context, to fantastic results. I encourage all listeners to share this episode with anyone who is interested in creating the calm, safe learning environments that all our students deserve.

Daniel’s blog and follow him on Twitter (@DanielBundred)

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